In this week's episode, Niki, Natalia, and Neil debate the women's march on Washington, US-Russian relations, and Obama's final speech to the nation.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

  • The Women’s March on Washington will take place the day after Donald Trump’s inauguration to protest the incoming administration. Natalia observed the march’s historical importance of mobilizing on a physical level in a social media age. Niki cited David Karpf’s argument in The MoveOn Effect of how slacktivism can become activism as the thin ties of social media grow into thick ties of political advocacy. Natalia lamented a recent Washington Post editorial that urged women marchers to not wear pink or sparkly items, and recommended Nan Enstad’s book, Ladies of Labor, Girls of Adventure, for understanding how the way women dress has often been used against them as political actors.

 

  • News that the Russian government had interfered in the 2016 election on behalf of Donald Trump brought a new dimension to U.S.-Russia relations, but we debated whether it represented a return of the Cold War. Natalia mentioned the New York Times op-ed from the former deputy director of the CIA, Michael Morell last year that endorsed Hillary Clinton in part because of his concern that Trump had become an “unwitting agent of the Russian Federation.” Neil recommended Ekaterina Pravilova’s Public Books essay on how Vladimir Putin has sowed disinformation and confusion throughout Russian society by attacking journalists, scientists, and historians.

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

On this week's show, Natalia, Neil, and Niki debate the decline of democracy in North Carolina, the trend toward legalization of marijuana, and the dominance of Alabama football.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

  • In a recent piece for U.S. News & World Report, Niki argued that North Carolina had become a “laboratory of illiberalism” because of recent measures to disenfranchise voters and strip power from elected officials. Natalia outlined North Carolina’s history as a state of “business progressivism.” Neil recommended Bill Chafe’s classic work, Civilities and Civil Rights, for how it complicates North Carolina’s legacy as a progressive state. 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Niki, Neil, and Natalia debate the legacy of departing First Lady Michelle Obama.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

  • As her time as First Lady comes to a close, Michelle Obama recently sat down for an interview with Oprah Winfrey. You can watch the interview here.

 

  • Natalia noted a 2014 New Republic profile of Michelle Obama had criticized her for having exacting standards and an unambitious agenda as First Lady.

 

  • Natalia observed the therapeutic features of Oprah’s interview with Michelle Obama which Neil contrasted with interviews of other First Ladies, such as Jackie Kennedy in 1962, which focused on their role as hostesses and caretakers of the White House. Natalia remembered Betty Ford’s 60 Minutes interview that bucked this trend because of Ford’s outspoken views. Niki commented that Barbara Walters’ interview of Ford had famously removed clips that would have shown the First Lady was drunk.

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Niki, Natalia, and Neil debate US involvement in Syria, the legacy of Japanese-American internment, and the 50th anniversary of the first Kwanzaa. 

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

  • 2016 marks the 50th anniversary of Kwanzaa, the African-American holiday that celebrates seven principles, including unity, self-determination, and collective economics.

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 


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AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Niki, Natalia, and Neil discuss the future of the One-China policy, the tragedy of the Oakland fire, and the Mall of America's first black Santa.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Natalia, Neil, and Niki debate Fidel Castro's legacy, the future of liberalism, and the rise of fake news.

  • Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Neil, Natalia, and Niki debate the Trump University fraud settlement, Mike Pence's reception at Hamilton, and the wild turkey's distaste for the wild. 

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Natalia, Neil, and Niki debate the role of citizenship in international adoption, Steve Bannon's appointment as Trump's chief strategist, and the place of safety pins in sartorial politics. 

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

  • Niki commented on need for historical analysis in the Trump era. 
Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's special election episode, Niki, Neil, and Natalia debate the onset of the Second Redemption, the highest and hardest glass ceiling, and the place of Donald Trump in global populism.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Natalia, Niki, and Neil debate the standoff at Standing Rock, the political role of the FBI, and the role of political pundits.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

  • The Standing Rock Sioux and activists are protesting the possible construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline under the Missouri River, the primary water source for the Standing Rock Sioux. Natalia situated the controversy in a long history of broken treaties between the federal government and Native Americans going back to the Treaty of Fort Laramie in 1868. Niki situated Standing Rock in a history of Native American protest, including Alcatraz and Wounded Knee. Neil commented on how Americans were using Facebook to “check in” to Standing Rock. Natalia also recommended Jill Lepore’s The Name of War and Philip Deloria’s Playing Indian for how white Americans fetishized Native Americans as “Noble savages.”  

 

  • FBI director James Comey has informed Congress that new emails found in an unrelated investigation might be related to the investigation of Hillary Clinton’s private server. Neil argued that both Republicans and Democrats were outraged with Comey’s letter because of their belief that the FBI is an apolitical agency, but history does not show that to be the case. Niki recommended a recent Backstory podcast interview with Beverly Gage who discussed the history of the FBI as a political institution. Natalia commented on the how the FBI had positioned its own history on the agency’s website.

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Niki, Natalia, and Neil debate the history of the world series, texting while driving, and the history of Vegas. 

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

  • Neil commented on the death of the fundamentalist cartoonist Jack Chick.

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Neil, Natalia, and Niki debate the history of rigged elections, Wikileaks, and the importance of self-care.

 

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

  • Niki talked about the renewed popularity of Janet Jackson’s 1986 hit “Nasty” in light of Donald Trump’s comments about Hillary Clinton in the third debate. 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Niki, Natalia, and Neil debate Donald Trump and sexual harassment and assault, the great clown scare of 2016, and pit bull bans.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Neil, Niki, and Natalia debate the place of Transparent in the history of LGBTQ representation on television, fraud at Wells Fargo, and the 20th anniversary of Fox News. 

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Niki, Natalia, and Neil discuss the presidential debates, the constitutionality of stop and frisk, and obesity and medical care.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

  • Do presidential debates change election results? Natalia pointed to research that showed debates had only small electoral effects. Neil discussed how the Lincoln-Douglas Senate debates of 1858 set the model for political debates in the country. Niki commented on how moderators fact-checked candidates in the 1976 and 2012 debates. Natalia and Niki live tweeted the first presidential debate this year at #PSLive.

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer
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In this week's episode, Niki, Natalia, and Neil debate the dissolution of the Jolie-Pitt marriage, the price of EpiPens, and Dr. Oz and medical entertainment.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Natalia, Neil, and Niki debate secrecy and presidential health, New York City's universal pre-kindergarten, and the legacy of Star Trek.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Neil, Niki, and Natalia debate the canonization of Mother Teresa, the rise of the alt-right, and the menace of taco trucks.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

  • The alt-right has made its presence known in the 2016 presidential race. Niki outlined the rise of the alt-right, something she has written about for U.S. News & World Report. Natalia discussed how the alt-right fit in the larger world of conservatism, citing the influence of George Nash in her thinking. Niki discussed the alt-right’s intellectual self-identity as smarter than the “old-school racist skinheads,” as Milo Yiannopolous wrote in Breitbart News in 2016.

 

  • The founder of Latinos for Trump warned there would soon be “taco trucks on every corner” if Donald Trump didn’t win the presidency. Natalia and Neil discussed whether this served as an effective political threat. Natalia shared how scholars of immigration have identified the lowest tolerance for immigrants as something called “contributionism,” where immigrants are appreciated only for what they contribute to American society. Niki placed the taco truck in a long history of food trucks, including chuck wagons and pushcarts. Natalia remembered the alarm when salsa recently outsold ketchup as America’s favorite condiment.

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

  • Natalia commented on the value of taking Phyllis Schlafly seriously.

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Natalia, Neil, and Niki debate Colin Kaepernick's protest against the national anthem, France's burkini ban, and Walmart's high crime rate.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer