In this week's episode, Natalia, Niki, and Neil debate Amazon's acquisition of Whole Foods, the disappearing teen summer job, and the politics of gerrymandering.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Niki, Neil and Natalia debate the outcome of the recent British election, Gwyneth Paltrow and Goop, and the history of Father's Day.

On this week’s Past Present podcast, Nicole Hemmer, Natalia Mehlman Petrzela, and Neil J. Young debate the British election results, Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle brand Goop, and Father’s Day.

 

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Neil, Natalia, and Niki debate the politics of pride marches, the history of climate change, and Kathy Griffin and the politics of offense.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

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AuthorNicole Hemmer
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In this week's episode, Natalia, Neil, and Niki debate the decline of the long-haul trucker, the future of NATO, and the national spelling bee.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

  • A New York Times article on long-haul truckers by Trip Gabriel detailed the declining status of truckers in American life. Niki commented the highpoint of truckers’ cultural cache in the 1970s, including popular cultural depictions like the movie Smokey and the Bandit. Neil cited Bruce Schulman’s argument in his book The Seventies about the “reddening” of America as another way of understanding truckers’ popularity in that decade. Natalia shared an essay in the Los Angeles Review of Books that observed what it called the “marginal characters” now attracted to the trucking profession.

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Niki, Natalia, and Neil debate jury selection in the Bill Cosby trial, Wonder Woman and feminism, and the fidget spinner.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

On this week's show, Niki, Natalia, and Neil debate Jim Comey’s firing, teeth and dental care, and the Bachelorette’s first black star.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

  • Niki talked about the death of Roger Ailes. Niki has written about Ailes for U.S. News and for Vox. She also recommended David Greenberg’s piece on Ailes in the New York Times
Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Neil, Natalia, and Niki debate historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), the Rebecca Tuvel controversy, and commencement speeches.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

  • Donald Trump recently suggested that a federal program that finances construction projects on historically black college and university campuses may be unconstitutional. But a few days later, he expressed “unwavering support” for HBCUs. Natalia observed Trump’s various moves to reach out to African Americans followed an Obama presidency that was often criticized for not reaching out to African Americans enough, something that the former president acknowledged in David Remnick’s New Yorker profile of him. Natalia also recommended Catharine Stimpson’s Public Books essay on how Trump looks to steer federal education funding to conservative Christian universities. Niki noted that in his book Between the World and Me, Ta-Nehisi Coates discussed how attending Howard University had uniquely shaped his life, something many graduates of HBCUs have argued. Neil drew parallels between the history of HBCUs and women’s colleges, and Natalia recommended Nancy Weiss Malkiel’s book, “Keep the Damned Women Out”: The Struggle for Coeducation, which traces the history of how elite universities opened their doors to women.   

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Niki, Natalia, and Neil discuss the causes of the Fyre Festival fiasco, the anniversary of the LA uprisings, and the history of US-North Korea relations.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Neil, Natalia, and Niki debate Trump's first 100 days, the history of Hawaii, and the rise of female genital mutilation in the United States. 

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

  • In the wake of Jeff Sessions’s calling dismissal of Hawai’i as an “island in the Pacific,” we discuss the long history of Hawai’i and how mainland Americans have exoticized it through the years.

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Natalia, Neil, and Niki debate the push for universal basic income, the rising visibility of scientific racism, and the disappearance of shopping malls. 

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Niki, Natalia, and Neil debate United's rough treatment of its passengers, Trump's missile attack on Syria, and the White House Easter egg roll.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

  • The brutal forced removal of a passenger from a recent United Airlines flight is the latest evidence of the unfriendly skies of air travel today. Natalia noted how different the contemporary flying experience is from the glamorous early days of air travel depicted in the 1967 stewardess memoir, Coffee, Tea or Me?, laying some of the blame on airline deregulation in the late 1970s. Neil pointed to 9/11 as another transformative moment for air travel, and noted that the increasing prevalence of camera phones meant airplane incidents could be easily captured, such as videos taken aboard United Flight 3411. Natalia observed how those who have defended United, such as Matt Walsh of the conservative website The Blaze, have argued that the problem was a resistance to authority rather than an example of corporate negligence or police brutality, as most others have argued.

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Neil, Natalia, and Niki debate Mike Pence's rules for women colleagues, the end of the Senate filibuster, and Pepsi's attempt to coopt Black Lives Matter.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Niki, Neil, and Natalia debate the fate of the American Health Care Act, the constructed nature of children's sleep, and Pluto's place among the planets.

 

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Neil, Natalia, and Niki debate whether intersectionality is a religion, the live-action remake of Beauty and the Beast, and Trump's plan to defund the NEA and NEH.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Natalia, Niki, and Neil debate Harvard's decision to drop the LSAT, George W. Bush's newfound popularity, and corporal punishment.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Niki, Natalia, and Neil debate Trump’s wiretapping allegations, “wellness real estate,” and late-night TV.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Natalia, Neil, and Niki debate the complicated politics of the women's strike, the rise of anti-Semitism in America, and humanity's relationship to robots.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Niki, Natalia, and Neil debate CPAC’s decision to disinvite Milo Yiannopoulos, legislation to require political balance in university faculties, and Christian blogger Momastery’s announcement of her lesbian engagement.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

  • An Iowa legislator has proposed a bill that would require faculty in the state’s university system to reflect a partisan balance. Neil outlined a history of conservative responses to universities as liberal bastions, including William Buckley’s 1951 classic, God and Man at Yale. Natalia mentioned Heterodox Academy, a project that advocates for more intellectual diversity on college campuses.

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

On this week’s Past Present podcast, Natalia, Niki, and Neil discuss the history of “paid protestors,” the science of secondhand smoke, and the failing fortunes of Ivanka Trump’s clothing line. 

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer

In this week's episode, Natalia, Niki, and Neil discuss the bawdy history of Valentine's Day, Obama's role in elevating black history, and the parallels between Andrew Jackson and Donald Trump.

Here are some links and references mentioned during this week’s show:

 

 

 

 

In our regular closing feature, What’s Making History:

 

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorNicole Hemmer